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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
is not executing war powers in a consistent and endless way? >> ron, you are a student of leadership, both a student of good leadership and bad leadership. i feel like leaders good and bad can generally be counted on to never give up power that they have been granted. if this president does draw a hard line under the war, the war on terror and say the war is over and the powers associated with this war are no longer the powers of this office, i mean, is that a fantasy? is this something you can imagine this president doing? >> you know, if he's going to do it, this constitutional law president, it will be in this term. it might be to the end of the term. the issues, no matter what happens on some of these sort of legal sort of standards, the issues in a way don't change. small groups of people can get their hands on weapons that were once powerful and reserved for nations. that doesn't change. that's carried by technology and it's one of the great perils of the modern age. that rule of law dually designated to shape the u.s. policies. now here, let's be clear on what's at stake here. it's
." that was the word today from ron barber, who was shot and wounded in the mass shooting in tucson last year that killed six people and wounded 13, including the grievous wounding of congresswoman gabby giffords. ron barber, who took gabby giffords' seat in congress after she stepped down to deal with her injuries. he said today, "as those of us in tucson know, senseless acts such as these tear at the very fabric of a community." mark kelly, gabby giffords' husband said today, "i just spoke with gabby, and she sends her prayers from tucson." in oak creek, wisconsin, where four months ago there was another mass shooting at a sikh temple, another six people gunned down at that temple. a school superintendent there today told the local press that she cried when she heard the news out of newtown, connecticut. she said "we always think it can't happen here, and we pray fervently that it won't. but as we know from our experience this summer, it can happen anywhere." the mayor of aurora, colorado, is still helping his community try to recover from the mass shooting there this summer where 12 people
of privacy amendments, including one from democratic senator ron wyden of oregon. his amendment would have required the head of the country's spy agencies to tell congress when americans accidentally got spied on. right now, we have no way of knowing how often that happens. also, republican senator rand paul of kentucky, he wanted to force the government to get a warrant to read our e-mails and other electronic communications. for privacy advocates, these amends were the good news. the bad news, the democratic-controlled senate killed every single one of those amendments. killed them dead. they voted them all down. and today the once-controversial warrantless wiretapping bill was extended for another five years, and amazingly, almost nobody seems to have noticed. we used to fight about this tough. the whole reason fisa needs congressional reauthorization every few years is that we are supposed to reassess it, debate it, have a big conversation about it. but we were quiet this time. so let's have one here. joining us now, not to be quiet about it, is my friend julian sanchez, a research fel
and she have ron and proctor and gamble. then home depot, goldman sachs, merck, coca-cola, macy's, yahoo, comcast, hi, current boss, marriott, at&t, it is not quite the entire fortune 500 but it's close. it is about to get closer. tomorrow there is a third meeting. the president speaking to another 100 or so ceos in washington. that makes three meetings with ceos in four weeks. this personal attention from the president has led to lots of positive statements from business leaders. for example, the head of marriott calling the president, quote, resoundingly reasonable. and yes, that is same marriott corporation that just put mitt romney back on the board of directors after his loss in the presidential election to that resoundingly reasonable president obama. mr. romney may have lost african-americans and latinos and women and young people and gay people and single people and independents and everybody in the country who makes $50,000 a year or less, but you know, mitt romney di as you wall street guys. when you look, fast forward to 2012, they all fled to become mitt romney's top contribu
for the littoral valley. gene cernan, harrison jack schmitt and ron evans aboard. apollo 17 launched at night, and when they landed three days later, the sun was behind them. and so that particular launch trajectory put a fully formed beautifully lit earth in the window of the command module at a time when the astronauts really should have been too busy to look at it. here is how al reinert, who co-wrote the movie "apollo 13" describes what happened. quote, at five hours and a few minutes into the flight of apollo 17, one of the crewmen looked out the window. what he saw inspired him to grab the only camera that wasn't stowed and snap a picture. but whoever did it said nothing on the radio or to their crewmates about it. it is possible they did it instinctively, hardly ever thinking about it because none of them thought to mention it for weeks. reinert doesn't say which of the three took the picture, partly because nasa gives all three credit for it, and partly because none of them were supposed to be taking pictures right then. today nbc veteran space correspondent jay barbree got gene cerna
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)